Quote
"They say that “Confronting triggers, not avoiding them, is the best way to overcome PTSD”. They point out that “exposure therapy” is the best treatment for trauma survivors, including rape victims. And that this involves reliving the trauma and exposing yourself to traumatic stimuli, exactly what trigger warnings are intended to prevent. All this is true. But I feel like they are missing a very important point.

YOU DO NOT GIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY TO PEOPLE WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT.

Psychotherapists treat arachnophobia with exposure therapy, too. They expose people first to cute, little spiders behind a glass cage. Then bigger spiders. Then they take them out of the cage. Finally, in a carefully controlled environment with their very supportive therapist standing by, they make people experience their worst fear, like having a big tarantula crawl all over them. It usually works pretty well.

Finding an arachnophobic person, and throwing a bucket full of tarantulas at them while shouting “I’M HELPING! I’M HELPING!” works less well.

And this seems to be the arachnophobe’s equivalent of the PTSD “advice” in the Pacific Standard. There are two problems with its approach. The first is that it avoids the carefully controlled, anxiety-minimizing setup of psychotherapy.

The second is that YOU DO NOT GIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY TO PEOPLE WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT."

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers | Slate Star Codex (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

Link

agoddamn:

don’t worship people. i’m serious. no matter how good they sound, how popular they are, how stinging their comebacks are, how moral they seem—do not worship people.

this is something that tumblr does constantly, and whether it starts as a joke or not it ends with many people…

Link

tegidsystem:

solar roadways are an unfeasible, impracticable, unsustainable engineering NIGHTMARE.

Please, for the love of all common sense and actually-good design ideas, do not give your money to the people who are publishing the idea as though it could actually work in the real world,…

Photoset

fuckyeahwomenprotesting:

221bitssmallerontheoutside:

Half of the women I spoke to said , would he admit that’s he’s bit of a sexist, misogynistic — he sees women only in sexual terms?  (x)

I effing love him.  Seriously.

I don’t know how I feel about Russel Brand but I do respect this. I do think it’s important to recognize that when you are in a position of privilege it’s hard to recognize when actions are oppressive or harmful and be willing to apologize and own up to it. 

(Source: masterdefender, via little-smartass)

Photo
aeromachia:

sergeantprnz:

WHO NAMED THIS FLOWER

IT BARGES INTO ALL YOUR CONVERSATIONS
IT GIVES YOU A STUPID NICKNAME WHEN YOU’VE MET, LIKE, ONCE
IT WIGGLES ITS STAMENS AT YOU SUGGESTIVELY FOR NO REASON
IT IS: THE AGGRESSIVELY FORWARD BEARDED IRIS

aeromachia:

sergeantprnz:

WHO NAMED THIS FLOWER

IT BARGES INTO ALL YOUR CONVERSATIONS

IT GIVES YOU A STUPID NICKNAME WHEN YOU’VE MET, LIKE, ONCE

IT WIGGLES ITS STAMENS AT YOU SUGGESTIVELY FOR NO REASON

IT IS: THE AGGRESSIVELY FORWARD BEARDED IRIS

(Source: , via catnipsoup)

Photo
thebaconsandwichofregret:

musaafer:

musaafer:

readyokaygo:

Photos like this are being spread across the internet lately, and they are dangerous for a few reasons. If you’re too lazy to read below; basically ignorant Americans are blaming other people, governments, and religions for problems their own nation caused.First, here is a history lesson on Afghanistan. From 1933 until 1973, Afghanistan was ruled under a man named Mohammed Zahir Shah. While he was a devout Muslim, he had a Western education in France. His reign marked four decades of peace and stability. With the introduction of a constitution Afghanistan progressively developed into a modern democratic state with free elections and a parliament, as well as a massive push for women’s rights, universal suffrage, education, worker’s rights, and civil rights. So yes, Afghanistan was doing well in the 60’s as this photo suggests. However, the photo doesn’t give you context for what went wrong.During this period in time the Soviet Union had a strong influence in Afghanistan. They supported modernization and education in the Afghan state. The United States, not wanting to risk their hegemony in the region, clearly had a major problem with this. They were terrified of the spread of Communism and quickly developed a plan. Afghanistan would become the Cold War’s chessboard. In the late 80’s, the Saudis, Pakistanis, and the Americans brought in radical Islamists from around the world. They armed, trained, and directed them into a militant force, and they were called the mujahideen. They became the US’ main offense against the Soviets. It wasn’t to defend the Afghans against the Soviets who were ready to pull out, but to deliver as much harm against them imaginable. Carter wanted Afghanistan to be the Soviet’s “Vietnam”. And it was. When they finally retreated Afghanistan spun into chaos and a civil war ensued under the militant mujahideen warriors. Within this framework we saw the rise of the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and of course Osama bin Laden. All under the auspices of the United States security forces and American tax-payer monies. Clinton’s bombing of Sudan and Afghanistan was directly responsible for their rise. Oh, and then in what was most likely the greatest immoral injustice of the 21st century the United States invaded Afghanistan in 2001 only further driving the besieged nation further into turmoil.What does this mean? The mujahideen, the Taliban, and Al Qaeda do not represent thousands of years of Afghan culture and Islam. They are a direct reaction to Western imperialism. The root cause for the disparity between the two pictures is foreign intervention. Not Islam, and certainly not Arabs.
Second, here is a history on Iran. Before 1953, Iran was ruled under a democratically elected man called Mohammad Mosaddegh. Under his reign Iran saw a progressive movement of social and political reforms. During this time Britain tried to establish an oil company (British Petroleum) on Iranian soil, and promised to share profit and technology with the Iranian government. However the British, as usual, didn’t honor their agreement. They, and the United States, began to steal Iran’s oil. Prime Minister Mosaddegh would not stand for this and demanded the seizure of the oil fields and the ouster of the British. In response, the British and the United States overthrew him in a coup and installed the Shah who was a brutal tyrant and ruled the nation under an absolute monarchy. The women in this picture did live well, but that was because they were members of a very small minority and in the Shah’s social circle. Everyone else in Iran lived under harsh conditions. The economy was failing, education was abysmal, and the entire nation was rural and very religious.Today, Iran’s health care is better. They have more political freedom. Education is improving, and the country is slowly globalizing. The economy is slightly better off, however that is quickly changing with the Western world’s sanctions against Iran in midst of their nuclear propaganda campaign at the behest of Israel. 
What does this mean? Essentially, the Islamic Revolution had little to do with the rise of an Islamic state; rather the resistance of Western imperialism. Almost every social and political group was united in resisting the Shah, from the communists to the secularists to the Islamists. They demanded Iranian sovereignty and political freedoms. Is the current regime in Iran perfect? Absolutely not, and I’m passionately against it. But this picture is extremely distortive of the truth.Unfortunately, we have gone full circle. Today, the United States is supporting terrorist cells in Iran in an attempt to oust the current Iranian regime. They want to establish another pro-Western government like the Shah and “try again” where they failed. They have been doing this for decades and it hasn’t been working well. That is why we are now seeing media hysteria against Iran, and their false quest to achieve nuclear power and bomb Israel. Iran is a peaceful nation, and always has been. They have never attacked another nation, and have absolutely no intention of attacking Israel or anyone else for that matter. The United States’ war against Iran is rooted solely to seek revenge for their failed foreign policy in the 70’s and to once again take control of their natural resources.In conclusion, if you think you can understand decades of history in the Middle East, or anywhere for that matter, by looking at a photograph you are a fucking idiot who has no right to engage in intellectual discussion or give your opinion on anything other than what you watched on TLC last night.

Emphasis mine. 
Also, if you measure progress and “development” in units of “Women in Western Clothing/sq. mile” you’re a fucking imperialist prick and can get the fuck out. 

Bringing this back for reasons. 

After the Taliban were kicked out of power in Aghanistan the BBC was covering the first elections and the fact that women were being allowed to vote. Most of the women queuing to vote were wearing the Burka which had been explained to us in the UK as a horrible thing that women were forced to wear by the Taliban in order to oppress them.
The journalist doing the piece walked up to one of the women and asked her why she still wore the Burka when she didn’t have to and the woman replied “Because it keeps the dust out of my eyes.”

thebaconsandwichofregret:

musaafer:

musaafer:

readyokaygo:

Photos like this are being spread across the internet lately, and they are dangerous for a few reasons. If you’re too lazy to read below; basically ignorant Americans are blaming other people, governments, and religions for problems their own nation caused.

First, here is a history lesson on Afghanistan. From 1933 until 1973, Afghanistan was ruled under a man named Mohammed Zahir Shah. While he was a devout Muslim, he had a Western education in France. His reign marked four decades of peace and stability. With the introduction of a constitution Afghanistan progressively developed into a modern democratic state with free elections and a parliament, as well as a massive push for women’s rights, universal suffrage, education, worker’s rights, and civil rights. So yes, Afghanistan was doing well in the 60’s as this photo suggests. However, the photo doesn’t give you context for what went wrong.

During this period in time the Soviet Union had a strong influence in Afghanistan. They supported modernization and education in the Afghan state. The United States, not wanting to risk their hegemony in the region, clearly had a major problem with this. They were terrified of the spread of Communism and quickly developed a plan. Afghanistan would become the Cold War’s chessboard. In the late 80’s, the Saudis, Pakistanis, and the Americans brought in radical Islamists from around the world. They armed, trained, and directed them into a militant force, and they were called the mujahideen. They became the US’ main offense against the Soviets. It wasn’t to defend the Afghans against the Soviets who were ready to pull out, but to deliver as much harm against them imaginable. Carter wanted Afghanistan to be the Soviet’s “Vietnam”. And it was. When they finally retreated Afghanistan spun into chaos and a civil war ensued under the militant mujahideen warriors. Within this framework we saw the rise of the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and of course Osama bin Laden. All under the auspices of the United States security forces and American tax-payer monies. Clinton’s bombing of Sudan and Afghanistan was directly responsible for their rise. Oh, and then in what was most likely the greatest immoral injustice of the 21st century the United States invaded Afghanistan in 2001 only further driving the besieged nation further into turmoil.

What does this mean? The mujahideen, the Taliban, and Al Qaeda do not represent thousands of years of Afghan culture and Islam. They are a direct reaction to Western imperialism. The root cause for the disparity between the two pictures is foreign intervention. Not Islam, and certainly not Arabs.

Second, here is a history on Iran. Before 1953, Iran was ruled under a democratically elected man called Mohammad Mosaddegh. Under his reign Iran saw a progressive movement of social and political reforms. During this time Britain tried to establish an oil company (British Petroleum) on Iranian soil, and promised to share profit and technology with the Iranian government. However the British, as usual, didn’t honor their agreement. They, and the United States, began to steal Iran’s oil. Prime Minister Mosaddegh would not stand for this and demanded the seizure of the oil fields and the ouster of the British. In response, the British and the United States overthrew him in a coup and installed the Shah who was a brutal tyrant and ruled the nation under an absolute monarchy. The women in this picture did live well, but that was because they were members of a very small minority and in the Shah’s social circle. Everyone else in Iran lived under harsh conditions. The economy was failing, education was abysmal, and the entire nation was rural and very religious.

Today, Iran’s health care is better. They have more political freedom. Education is improving, and the country is slowly globalizing. The economy is slightly better off, however that is quickly changing with the Western world’s sanctions against Iran in midst of their nuclear propaganda campaign at the behest of Israel. 

What does this mean? Essentially, the Islamic Revolution had little to do with the rise of an Islamic state; rather the resistance of Western imperialism. Almost every social and political group was united in resisting the Shah, from the communists to the secularists to the Islamists. They demanded Iranian sovereignty and political freedoms. Is the current regime in Iran perfect? Absolutely not, and I’m passionately against it. But this picture is extremely distortive of the truth.

Unfortunately, we have gone full circle. Today, the United States is supporting terrorist cells in Iran in an attempt to oust the current Iranian regime. They want to establish another pro-Western government like the Shah and “try again” where they failed. They have been doing this for decades and it hasn’t been working well. That is why we are now seeing media hysteria against Iran, and their false quest to achieve nuclear power and bomb Israel. Iran is a peaceful nation, and always has been. They have never attacked another nation, and have absolutely no intention of attacking Israel or anyone else for that matter. The United States’ war against Iran is rooted solely to seek revenge for their failed foreign policy in the 70’s and to once again take control of their natural resources.

In conclusion, if you think you can understand decades of history in the Middle East, or anywhere for that matter, by looking at a photograph you are a fucking idiot who has no right to engage in intellectual discussion or give your opinion on anything other than what you watched on TLC last night.

Emphasis mine. 

Also, if you measure progress and “development” in units of “Women in Western Clothing/sq. mile” you’re a fucking imperialist prick and can get the fuck out. 

Bringing this back for reasons. 

After the Taliban were kicked out of power in Aghanistan the BBC was covering the first elections and the fact that women were being allowed to vote. Most of the women queuing to vote were wearing the Burka which had been explained to us in the UK as a horrible thing that women were forced to wear by the Taliban in order to oppress them.

The journalist doing the piece walked up to one of the women and asked her why she still wore the Burka when she didn’t have to and the woman replied “Because it keeps the dust out of my eyes.”

Photoset

ramblingferret:

sizvideos:

Penn and Teller on Vaccinations - Video

And even if that Autism thing was true (WHich it fucking isn’t) your kid is still safe from these diseases.

What’s fucking worse? You saying you’d rather have dead kid then and Autistic one? Seriously Anti-vaxxers need to banished to the moon something.

(via victoriansilurianlesbianthespian)

Photoset

catbuttcat:

hopefulveterinarian:

Excellent alternative to the yellow ribbon concept.

Check them out here: Friendly Dog Collars

I just love these so much.

Photoset
Photo
theshriekingsisterhood:

isabelknight:

immunity cat also shelters you from coercive “reblog this or you aren’t a real X/you’re a terrible person” posts. It is OK to not emotionally blackmail your followers.

Relevant to my dash

theshriekingsisterhood:

isabelknight:

immunity cat also shelters you from coercive “reblog this or you aren’t a real X/you’re a terrible person” posts. It is OK to not emotionally blackmail your followers.

Relevant to my dash

(Source: deadrunespark, via alichay)